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Tuesday, December 9, 2008

Needlepoint Kits For Sale

Needlepoint is a relaxing and rewarding hobby, because when you're done, you've created a stunning work of art. To get started in needlepoint, you can visit a local needlepoint shop, pick out a canvas, yarns, and needles, and get started. But, there's a much easier way to break into this fascinating hobby.
Needlepoint kits for sale online or in craft stores are a great way to learn needlepoint. Everything you need to get started is included in the kit, so you don't need to buy tools you don't need, and you don't need to worry about picking out yarns, deciding on shades, and choosing a canvas. Needlepoint kits for sale include all these items, so all you have to do is choose the kit you like, follow the instructions, and start needlepointing.
You can find needlepoint kits for sale at auction sites like eBay, and sometimes you can choose from kits in lots, with more than one kit to keep you busy. Local craft and needlework stores are good sources of needlepoint kits, too.
What should you look for in needlepoint kits for sale? There are several things that can help you buy just the right needlepoint kit for you.
• The canvas. Look for a canvas that is printed in bright, easy to see colors, and that is printed straight and level on the canvas. If the design is crooked, you'll have a hard time following it as you stitch. Also, look for canvas rather than plastic canvas, plastic is much harder to work on, especially for beginners.
• Yarn. Look for high quality wool yarn that is long-lasting and easy to stitch with. Cheap acrylic yarns can split and sometimes pill, which distracts from the design.
• Needle. Make sure the kit contains a tapestry needle that will fit the yarn and the canvas size in your kit.
• Clear directions. The kit should include clear, easy-to-read directions that show you all the steps to create your first needlepoint project. If you've never done needlepoint before, this is an extremely important part of your kit.
• Frame. Does the kit come with a frame to hold your work while you stitch? Some needlepointers don't use frames, but it is often easier to work on a bigger project in a frame. If a frame doesn't come in the kit, choose one at your local craft or needlepoint store.
Once you have found the perfect kit, read through the directions. If you have any questions, check with your local needlework shop, or at online needlepoint sites, so you can see just how to stitch your canvas and create your design. It's best to start with a kit that uses the basic, continental needlepoint stitch to start out, then you can add more complicated and decorative stitches as you become more experienced.
Needlepoint is such a rewarding and relaxing hobby, once you complete your first project, you'll probably quickly start searching for more needlepoint kits for sale! Always look for high-quality kits with high-quality contents and you'll be a needlepoint pro in no time at all.
Lucy Bushman is an accomplished niche website developer and author. To learn more about needlepoint kits, please visit Needlepoint Hobbyist for current articles and discussions.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lucy_Bushman

Needlepoint - Right from the Beginning

Sometimes I think that although I became addicted to needlepoint in 1970, I did not really learn how to do needlepoint until sometime in the early 80’s. Because my then I actually had learned about materials, good technique etc. So here’s a pile of mostly unorganized tips to get you started right.
Use your guild or shop! Shopowners want to turn your from browsers into regular customers. So ask them how to do a stitch, what thread you could try, what might be a good background. Take a beginner’s class if it is offered. Find out the name and meeting time of your local guild. When I am at my local shop stitching, I often help the customers there. Stitchers are friendly and love to share!
Use the freebies out there. Many sites and shops have free patterns. These patterns can help you learn new threads, techniques and stitches. If you use them for practice instead of a doodle cloth, you could have something charming when you are done to look at with pride.
It will not necessarily be right the first time, but strive to make it as good as you can. Going slowly at first helps. Your hands learn the pattern and rhythm of the stitch. Strive for correct placement and even tension of each stitch. This is especially important when doing tent stitch. Work on small pieces until you feel comfortable with correct tension. Even after more than 30 years, my tension can be improved — but it has been good for at least two thirds of that time because I worked at it.
Know what things you have and keep them together. I go through my stash about one a year, clean up things regularly and keep an inventory of threads. It does not always work, but I am much better about not buying things I already own.
Get needlepoint tools and a container to keep them in. This will keep them corralled. In our house tweezers are the thing we lose — people take my needlepoint ones and then I do not have them when I need them.
Use a frame of some kind for your needlepoint. This can be a scroll frame or stretcher bars (not an embroidery hoop). Since tension is at the heart of needlepoint (you are really making a new fabric here), keeping your canvas taut makes a difference. Get in this habit early and you won’t have problems later.
Find a good stitching chair. People stitch in lots of different places and where you sit should be comfortable not cramped. Lots of people like chairs which let them sit mostly straight with high backs. I used a wing chair for years, but now I have switched to a Mission style recliner with wide wood arms.
This may sound strange, but have the TV on (even if it’s muted) or talk to someone when you stitch. If you keep your eyes on your stitching and don’t look up, your eyes will get fatigued. If you are talking to someone or watching TV, then you will look up to see what is happening. Doing this even for a few seconds regularly will relieve the strain. My family knows when I have a stitching deadline because I rent three movies a day! Last — stitch because you love it! Make what you do a pleasure, even if it’s just for yourself.
Janet M. Perry is one of the leading writers of needlepoint stitch guides in the world. She writes innovative guides for needlepoint canvases from over 20 designers. She puts into practice her motto to make needlepoint fast, fun and affordable.
She is an expert in needlepoint, both on the Web and through her writing as the Needlepoint Pro for Cross-Stitch & Needlework magazine. She works with deigners, shops, and thread manufacturers on new products and regularly reports on trends in needlepoint.
Her newest book, Needlepoint Trade Secrets, will be available in the summer of 2007 on Amazon. Visit her website (http://www.napaneedlepoint.com) or blog (http://www.nuts-about-needlepoint.com) to learn about my newest products.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Janet_M._Perry
Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Selling Completed Embroidery Projects

Embroidery is a fantastic hobby, for many people it is incredibly soothing. However, after many years of embroidery as a hobby, you may find that the amount of finished projects you have accumulated is vast. This is when you should consider selling them.
I expect you have probably given a lot of your embroidery and other sewing work to friends and family as gifts for Birthdays and Christmas, but after a few years it’s nice to offer them something else. You could use the extra money you raise from selling your embroidery projects to fund your Christmas shopping.
When you decide to start selling your embroidery projects, you should first think about the usefulness of it. For example, you have a finished cross stitch piece but you have done nothing with it. For many people, this would not be an enticing project to buy, because although you have finished the embroidery side of it, they would not consider it to be finished. What you need to think about is how you can convert it in to a useful or decorative object. Could your embroidery piece become a cushion cover, the top of an ottoman, a wall hanging etc. Pieces of embroidery like this are much more likely to sell.
The type of embroidery you have completed may also effect the price, for example, a piece of completed cross stitch may not fetch as much as a completed piece of Assisi embroidery, as Assisi is often thought of as historic embroidery and cross stitch is considered to be very modern.
You will need to consider your selling venue, craft fairs are an excellent place to start, as you will get to meet other crafters and embroiderers who will guide you, offer you advice and often be a good inspiration for more of your embroidery work. You will often fetch a much higher price for your work at a craft fair than you will else where.
Another option that presents itself to most embroiderers is using online auctions such as ebay. This is simply because of the ease of use, there is no planning involved and you can list your items on when you have time. Although ebay has its benefits, you’ll be hard pressed to get a very good price on your item, so choose your venue carefully.
When you price your work there are a few things you should add in to the cost. Include the cost of materials, any postage costs if you order the materials via the Internet or mail order, any fuel if you had to collect your materials, work out your hourly rate and then calculate the number of hours that it too you to complete. Some people may advise you to multiply that number by 4, however it is up to you. Often a piece of embroidery can take months to finish, and multiplying the cost by 4 would make the finished piece out of many peoples price range, so choose wisely.
If you are still unsure there is a third option open to you, and that is getting someone else to sell your embroidery for you. If you are lucky enough to live in a tourist town you could approach gift shops to sell your embroidery projects, or if not, many craft shops have displays of finished wares. Often these shops will also help you with pricing and give you a guide. If you build up a good relationship with these shops you may find you get commissions for your embroidery which will earn you quite a bit of extra money.
Written by Laura Marsh. For more useful information on different types of embroidery visit http://www.simplyblackwork.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Laura_Marsh

The Many Embroidery Supplies

Do you know the different tools that the ladies in the Victorian Era used when they were into their tapestries? It would not matter how long ago it was, embroidery supplies must have been ready for use. For earlier civilizations that were into sewing, what could they have used for their tools? These people were smart and were able to come up with their own items.
Common knowledge will tell you that before you learn the simplest sewing like cross stitch, the running stitch, or the quarter stitch, you will need to become familiar with the supplies you will need for embroidery. You can not use the many items for creating the best designs if you do not know what they are used for.
You will certainly not find it hard when you are looking for embroidery supplies because they are available in mot of the stores. You can find them in the online stores giving you an easier way since you will be able to shop from home. By using your mouse you will be able to get your order sent to you in a flash. In a few days, you will have all the products you have ordered right in from of you. If the ancients were still around today, they would love to try this way of shopping.
One of the things you will need is the hoop. This item is round or oval in shape. It usually comes made out of wood, plastic, or spring form and will hold the fabric in place. Most of the hoops have brass screws that will allow you to make it tighter or looser than it was before. You will find that three hoops exist. They are the jacket back, the magnetic, and the tubular. The tubular has arms for the loops that are on the outside. The jacket back will give you a strong tight hold. And the magnetic has ends that are secured together.
You will also find that you will need bobbin thread. You will find that four types of this thread exist. They are spun polyester, cotton, nylon, and continuous filament. The cotton can accommodate a large range of tensions because of the texture. The polyester is closer to the wool. The continuous filament gives a clean result and does not leave any lint behind. Nylon is the strongest when you are adding pressure to it.
You can also find more info on Embroidery Design Software and Embroidery Designs. Allthingsembroidery.com is a comprehensive resource to know more aboutEmbroidery.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dave_Faulkner
Monday, November 24, 2008

Enhance Your Embroidery With Beads And Sequins

All embroidery projects are absolutely beautiful on their own, and often need no form of enhancement. But for that extra special finish you can add beads and sequins to your embroidery.
There are a few ways to add these extra special touches to your embroidery projects. You can incorporate them in to your stitches as you are creating your embroidery piece. To incorporate beads and sequins in to your embroidery stitches you will need very tiny beads and sequins, look in your local hobby store for seed beads and matching sequins. When attaching something as small as a seed bead to any project you will need to make sure you have a small enough needle, so make sure you purchase a beading needle.
You can also add beads and sequins to your embroidery projects once you have finished them. For example, you may only wish to add a few beads or sequins to highlight an area, such as the sparkle on a start or the twinkle in a characters eyes. This finish is very understated, but it will add just that little touch of perfection many sewers seek in their embroidery projects. You may wish to use a clear thread for this, so as not to disturb the colors of the embroidery or the sequins and beads.
Another method for attaching beads and sequins to embroidery is by using surface embroidery. This is a little more technical than simple sewing the beads and sequins directly onto the fabric. With surface embroidery of any kind the idea is to create a pattern on the top of the fabric, with minimal wastage of thread on the reverse, it can also cover a large area very quickly, where are sewing on individual beads and sequins cannot.
There are many methods of surface embroidery, although for attaching items such as beads and sequins I would recommend trying a crochet method. You simply use a tiny crochet hook to pass the thread though the fabric and when it comes back through, you make the next look and also attach a bead or sequin. This is also known as surface crochet, and can make your embroidery projects very original.
If you are looking for an even more amazing finish to your embroidery projects you could consider adding specialty threads, such as metallic threads or even embroidery threads made of special fibers such as silk or mohair.
Written by Laura Marsh. Did you find the information on beads and sequins with embroidery useful? You can find out more about enhancing your embroidery at http://www.simplyblackwork.com

Custom Embroidery

Aside from the beauty of nature, your own personal style as well as your unique individuality can be reflected in any form of art, including the laborious art form of embroidery. Embroidery is an art form that uses needles and threads to make designs and patterns on any piece of cloth or fabric by weaving or sewing. It entails clear eyesight and dexterous hands to do the intricate details of designs and patterns. There are several types of customized embroidery that can surely reflect your total personality type.
Custom embroidery can be done either traditionally by hand or by electronic embroidery sewing machines operated and controlled by computers. Hand designs are truly difficult, especially if you desire a specific design that will involve complicated sewing and weaving of threads. There are several types of hand designs that can be used to make custom embroidery. A few of the things you can use are the famous Assisi design, Blackwork, Counted Thread, and Whitework.
Aside from hand made designs, custom embroidery can also be done through embroidery sewing machines. This type can give you many varied custom designs. You can also give your own design that can very well express your individuality, which can be easily crafted since it is done with the aid of computers. Unlike the hand designs, computer made custom embroidery can be done without going through much difficulties.
Besides the traditional embroidery makers or stores near you, the Internet can also be an avenue for you to have the type of embroidery product that will match the specific details that you desire. You can browse online for embroidery stores that you can trust. Just make sure that the on line store that you decided to transact business with are indeed reliable and authentic.
Embroidery provides detailed information on Embroidery, Embroidery Machines, Custom Embroidery, Embroidery Designs and more. Embroidery is affiliated with Used Embroidery Machines.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jennifer_Bailey
Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Essential Cross Stitch Supplies You Will Want to Buy

Are you planning to present a cross stitched item made by you as a gift for your friend's birthday or as a Christmas present for your grandmother? It is an excellent and very innovative idea and you will be thanked for giving them such unique gifts. Cross stitch is very easy and if you are a beginner then also it is hassle free. You can start with simple designs and migrate to complicated ones once you are accustomed with the process. There are some important necessities like the cross stitch materials that you need for your creation.
Fabric
The most favored fabric for cross stitch is the Aida. It is made of cotton and has large pores. So this is a very good material to work on if you are a novice or if your eyesight is not good. You can use some other cross stitch materials also such as linen which give very good effects. It is better that you first try out your handiwork on inexpensive fabrics. Make sure to use an embroidery hoop which helps in keeping your fabric taut and facilitates easy stitching This also ensures no oil staining problems on your fabric and prevents your hands from becoming moist. Leave a gap of 3-4 inches on each side of the design.
Needles
Tapestry needles are best suited for your cross stitching purposes and one of the most essential cross stitch materials The blunt end and the large eye of the needle prevents damage to the fabric. Select the right sized needles that can pass through the holes in the fabric effortlessly without enlarging them or distorting the fabric. Also never leave your needles on the fabric as it could leave a stain.
Threads
Use single strands of embroidery floss when you are using 2 threads for stitching. If you are uncertain about the color fastness of the floss make sure that you wash them before you use them. Immerse the individual skeins separately in distilled water. If the color of the embroidery floss bleeds when you move it in water remove the skein and use the same procedure with fresh water till the color stops running. Remove and dry it.
Frames and Hoops
Embroidery frames and hoops are good options among cross stitch materials to mount your fabric onto so that it is easy to handle and the stitches are smooth. Select a frame that envelops your entire design without you having to fold the fabric or bend it. If you use white bias tape on the outer ring of the hoop this will hold the fabric in place and prevent it from staining as well. Using a tissue paper between your fabric and the wooden hoop also helps to prevent your fabrics from getting stained by the wooden hoops.
Scissors
Always use a sharp pair of embroidery scissors for cutting the threads neatly.
April owns website Cross Stitch Supplies which has details of where to purchase cheap cross stitch frames and cheapest cross stitch kits
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=April_Kerr

How to Use a Needlepoint Stitch Dictionary

A book like The Needlepoint Book can be one of your handiest tools when you are stitching. While this book is like a college degree in needlepoint between covers, most people (even experienced stitchers) turn to it because of the wealth of information about stitches included in it. These kinds of books are called stitch dictionaries.
In a stitch dictionary you will find many different needlepoint stitches diagrammed for you. Often, as is the case here, there are also pictures of the stitches worked on canvas.
The diagrams tell you how to make the stitch. Sometimes, as in my diagrams, the stitches aren’t numbered, sometimes, as in The Needlepoint Book, they are. Although for most stitches you don’t need to follow the numbering diagram for making the stitches, it is good to do so until you understand how to make the stitch. Then you can work them any way you like.
Often the stitches in stitch dictionaries are divided into families of stitches. Some of the families are diagonal, cross, box, straight and compound. Each family of stitches consists of stitches which share common characteristics. In the case of diagonal stitches, all the stitches are made up of diagonal lines, which do not form a definite box.
A unique feature of The Needlepoint Book is the table of stitches which appears at the beginning of each chapter of stitch diagrams. It lists along the left side each of the stitches which appears in the chapter. Then it gives information about the characteristics of each stitch. It tells you about possible uses (border, background, accent, etc.) whether it will work for areas which receive lots of wear (backing, snag-proof), how much texture and pattern it has, and whether it uses a ton of yarn.
I love these tables because I can use them to find a perfect stitch for a particular use.
Other stitch dictionaries, such as the Stitches for Effect books, will have lists of stitches for particular areas, which are divided by area (sometimes even in different books), or will say something in the text itself.
I also make notes about the stitches in the margins of my stitch dictionaries. Sometimes I note when I use the stitch, sometimes I comment on whether I like the stitch or not. And when I’ve done classes exploring threads, I them as opportunities to try new stitches. That way my stitch dictionaries become records of my needlepoint experiences.
When I’m planning a canvas I look at my stitch dictionaries to get ideas for stitches. Often seeing a picture of a stitch will spark your imagination -- what about Encroached Gobelin for the mermaid’s hair? How about a nice, knobby cross stitch for that gold patch? Every stitch dictionary I own (and I have dozens) has unique stitches in it.
As you become more familiar with different stitches and threads in needlepoint, you will find your own favorite stitches. Some teachers like particular kinds of stitches so much they become trademarks. For example, Jean Hilton has invented and is identified with wonderful “string art” stitches. She uses them in most of her designs and they are so associated with her that people call the “Jean Hilton stitches.”
Janet M. Perry is one of the leading writers of needlepoint stitch guides in the world. She writes innovative guides for needlepoint canvases from over 20 designers. She puts into practice her motto to make needlepoint fast, fun and affordable.
She is an expert in needlepoint, both on the Web and through her writing as the Needlepoint Pro for Cross-Stitch & Needlework magazine. She works with deigners, shops, and thread manufacturers on new products and regularly reports on trends in needlepoint.
Her newest book, Needlepoint Trade Secrets, will be available in the summer of 2007 on Amazon. Visit her website (http://www.napaneedlepoint.com) or blog (http://www.nuts-about-needlepoint.com) to learn about my newest products.
Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Interesting Facts on Cross Stitch Embroidery

What exactly is cross stitch embroidery : Cross-stitch is one of the oldest forms of embroidery and is famous amongst enthusiasts across the world. Many folk museums show examples of clothing decorated with cross-stitch, especially from continental Europe and Asia. Cross-stitch is a popular form of counted-thread embroidery in which X-shaped stitches are used to form a picture.
There are two different stitching techniques commonly used in Cross Stitch Embroidery.
The first, the "stab" method, is used by most beginning stitchers. The stab method involves moving the hand back and forth from the front of the fabric to the back of the fabric. The needle is "stabbed" into the front of the fabric, left there, and then pulled through from the other side. The second, the "Sewing" method is a favourite of stitchers who prefer to hold the fabric in the hand instead of hoop.
Each stitch technique has unique characteristics. The stab method is effective when using a hoop or frame. The stab method of stitching does not distort the fabric. It is easy to make certain that the stitch is placed properly. In the sewing method, the stitcher's hand and needle stay on top of the fabric, except when securing floss. The needle scoops under the weave of the fabric. Since this requires practice, the sewing method is not the best for beginners. It is more difficult to ensure stitch placement, and the fabric can be distorted by the scooping motion. For more experienced stitchers, this sewing technique is preferred for some projects because a hoop is not required and the speed is considerably faster.
Some forms of Cross Stitch : Here we introduce you to some of the common and famous forms of cross stitch : Counted cross-stitch is unique since this involves actual counting of each of the stitches. Cross-stitch is done on designs printed on the canvas, showing every single cross (stamped cross-stitch)."
Two-dimensional (unshaded) cross-stitch in floral and geometric patterns, usually worked in black and red cotton floss on linen, is characteristic of folk embroidery in Eastern and Central Europe.
Multicoloured, shaded, painting-like patterns as we know them today are a recent development, deriving from similar shaded patterns of Berlin wool work of the mid-nineteenth century
Cross-stitch is the most popular form of hobby embroidery in the western world. It lends itself well to recreational use, as it is easy to learn and very versatile.
In the United States, the earliest known cross-stitch sampler is currently housed at Pilgrim Hall in Plymouth, Massachusetts (Pilgrim Hall).The sampler was created by Loara Standish, the daughter of Captain Myles Standish, circa 1653.
Traditionally, cross-stitch was used to embellish items like dishcloths, household linens, and doilies (only a small portion of which would actually be embroidered). Although there are many cross-stitchers who still employ it in this fashion, especially in Europe, it is now more popular to simply embroider plain pieces of canvas and hang them on the wall for decoration. There are many cross-stitching "guilds" across the United States and Europe which offer classes, collaborate on large projects, stitch for charity, and provide other ways for local cross-stitchers to get to know one another.
Embroidery Designs Guide
Hand Embroidery Designs
Amazing Embroidery Designs
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shikha_Deepak
Tuesday, October 7, 2008

Gobble (w/chm)

How many of us have ever felt this way after eating a Thanksgiving Dinner? I know I definately start wobbling after I'm done.!!!



post stitches turkey gobbletill you wobble
Designer:

Sue Hillis Designs
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $6.00 On Sale For: $5.10



Monday, October 6, 2008

Learn How To Cross Stitch – Fast!

Speak to most people who cross stitch and they will be the first to tell you that they love cross stitching because it is so relaxing. It also gives you a great sense of accomplishment and pride to show off your finished pieces. Best of all – it is so easy to learn.
There are two types of cross stitching – one type is called counted cross stitch (where you work from a pattern) and the other type is called stamped cross stitch (where the design has been pre-printed onto fabric). Stamped cross stitch is also called “no count cross stitch” because you do not have to count the squares on the fabric to figure out where a stitch should be placed.
Counted cross stitch transfers a design from a printed pattern onto evenweave fabric. One square in the fabric represents one square on the pattern. Each square on the pattern, which contains a symbol, represents a stitch. The different symbols on the pattern represent different colors of floss. The stitcher uses embroidery floss to place X's on the fabric corresponding to the symbols on the pattern.
To Begin, find the center of the graph. For most patterns this is shown with arrows or a bold line. Next, find the center of your fabric. An easy way to do this is to fold the fabric in half vertically and "pinch" with your finger to make a small crease. Open the fabric, fold in half horizontally and make another "pinch". Open the fabric up. The two creases will mark the center of the fabric. Most stitchers like to start cross stitching close to the center of the design in order to keep the design centered on the fabric. This makes it easier to frame the finished piece. Another benefit by starting at the center is that you know you will have enough material. It would be an absolute nightmare if you started on one side, only to get to the other side and find out that after all your hard work, you don’t have enough material to finish your design on.
To begin stitching, bring the threaded needle up from the back of the fabric leaving about a 1" tail of thread behind the fabric. Stitch the next 5 or 6 stitches over the tail. Clip off extra thread. To end off, weave your needle back through the last 5 or 6 stitches and clip the thread short so as not to leave a loose tail. Do not make knots on the back of the fabric when starting or ending your stitching, as the knots will make lumps on the fabric and will not allow the piece to lie flat.
When stitching your little X’s, first work a row of half stitches (////) one way, then work backwards to complete the X's. It is important that all the X's are crossed in the same direction. That is, the top thread of the X should always slant in the same direction (for example, "/"). It does not matter which way they slant, but if they are mixed the finished piece will look uneven.
Remember to relax as you stitch and do not pull the thread too tight. Your stitches should lie flat on your fabric and not distort the holes or the fabric.
When your stitching is complete, wash in cool water using a mild liquid detergent. Rinse well. Do not wring, but roll in a clean towel to absorb most of the water. While still damp, place face down on a terry towel. Place another cloth on top of the needlework and press lightly with a warm iron. Let dry. Then frame or finish as desired.
To see more information on cross stitching, including free patterns and framing ideas, please visit http://www.beautifulcreations.ca
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Joanne_Jones

How to Embroider For Beginners

If you are interested in learning embroidery, then the first step is to learn about the various stitches. Once you have learnt and understood each stitch, then no matter how complex a design maybe, it is not difficult to fill it up. Ideally, you must start with a simple design and the progress towards larger designs that also require more detailing.
In this guide of how to embroider for beginners we will take a look at various embroidery stitches...
The stitches:
The line stitch: This is the stitch usually done to create the outline of a design. This is the simplest and most basic stitch also used in sewing objects. There are various line stitches, which are as follows:
Running stitch: This is also termed as the basic sewing stitch; and is also used as a decorative embroidery stitch. Right-handed individuals will work this stitch from the right to the left, or top to bottom, as required. The left-handers will ideally work from left to right, or bottom to top. This is a forward running, continuous stitch.
Whipped running stitch: In this stitch the needle has to be brought up to the point where the running stitch began. Following this the needle has to be taken down through each of the running stitches. If a contrast thread is used then the line would look like a candy.
Back stitch: This is also an outline stitch and is used for sewing objects. This is a tight stitch. With this stitch the gap in the running stitch is covered.
Outline stitch: In this type of stitch the stitches form a solid rope-like line.
Stem stitch: This is a stitch, which is tighter than the outline stitch. This stitch is ideal for creating embroidered leaves and flowers.
The other stitches include:
Coral stitch Scroll stitch Chained stitch Fishbone stitch Flat stitch Satin stitch Buttonhole stitch Lazy-daisy stitch French knot Fly stitch
Embroidery patterns can be used to adorn any kind of dresses including wedding outfits and pageant dresses.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jennie_Gandhi
Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Knoting on the back side of a piece

I would like to get your feeling on whether or not to tie a knot on the back of a piece that you are stitching. I have read a few articles that say you aren't supposed to do that. On many pieces that I have done I have in fact put knots on the reverse side. What are your feelings about doing this and how do you handle tieing off the ends of thread when you are done.

Faery Tales


Designer:

Heaven And Earth Designs
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $15.00 On Sale For: $12.75

link: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-20606-200-faery-tales.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

I have to say, if nothing else I do like all of the colors and action in this one. It's cute
Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Christmas Stitching

Below I have listed a few christmas stitching ideas and the link to where they can be purchased. It is never to late to start stitching for Christmas or get ideas for others that do.

Holy Nativity



Even the woodland creatures are in awe of the Holy Family. The true meaning of the holiday season shines forth in this design on 18 count ivory Aida. Kit includes fabric, a rich array of cotton thread, needle, and easy instructions. Finished size: 5"x7".
Publisher:

Dimensions
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

5X7
Price: $9.99

Noel


Kit includes: Beads, charms, perforated paper, needles, floss, chart and instructions. Package of 3.
Publisher:

Mill Hill
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

3.5" X 2.5"
Price: $18.00
here is the link: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-22148-227-noel.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

Jingle Bells


Kit includes: Beads, ceramic buttons, perforated paper, needles, floss, chart and instructions.
Publisher:

Mill Hill
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

5" X 5"
Price: $12.00

Gardener's Stocking



Publisher:

Janlynn
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

18" Long
Price: $23.99

here is the link: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-20501-227-gardeners-stocking.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

Festive Snowmen Stocking


A COLLECTION OF SNOW "FLAKES" LEND THEIR SMILE-INDUCING CHARMS to inspire joy and happiness for busy holiday revelers. This stocking topper is ready for stitching. NO ASSEMBLY REQUIRED.The Stocking is made of Soft Red Fleece on both sides. The 14-count White Aida cuff encircles the top of the stocking accomodating your preference as to whether the toe points to the left or right. This soft and fuzzy Counted Cross Stitch stocking will hold all those goodies Santa brings on Christmas Eve. This showy, snowy design is by Linda Gillum for Kooler Design Studio, Inc. Alphabet included for personalization.Each kit contains 14-count White cotton Aida cuff sewed on a pre-finished Red fleece stocking, 6-strand carded cotton floss, needle, graph and instructions in English, French, Spanish and German. Stitch Count: 119W x 54H. Stocking Length: 18" (45,7 cm) diagonally.
Designer:

Linda Gillum
Publisher:

Janlynn
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

18" (45,7 cm)
Floss:

6-strand carded cotton floss
Fabric:

14-count White cotton Aida Red fleece stocking
Price: $17.99

here is the link: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-6402-227-festive-snowmen-stocking.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

Monday, September 15, 2008

I Need Coffee Now! Mini Counted Cross Stitch Kit

How many of us have ever felt this way? For me it's first thing in the morning.


Publisher:

Dimensions
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

7" X 5"
Price: $8.49 On Sale For: $7.22

Here is the link to purchase this great item: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-22067-220-i-need-coffee-now-mini-counted-cross-stitch-kit.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

Winter Rose


girl ice skating on frozen pond winter marilyn leavitt imblum
Designer:

Lavender & Lace
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $12.00

I am a big figure skating fan and skate myself. I think this is really cute. Here is the link to purchase this item: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-12155-156-winter-rose.aspx?=AFFILIATEID10101
Thursday, September 11, 2008

Light House



Coastal Lighthouse, Dimensions, Kit Includes: Cotton embroidery thread, design printed on tan fabric, needle and easy instructions including a color accented chart. (Mat / Frame not included.)
Publisher:

Dimensions, Inc.
Product Type:

Stamped Kit
Size:

5X7
Price: $8.49

I have always loved light houses

Here is the link to purchase this item: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-19739-252-coastal-lighthouse-stamped-kit.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101
Monday, September 8, 2008

Halloween Patterns on Sale

For those that are big Halloween fans follow this link: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/c-118-halloween.aspx to buy patterns on sale from now until September 14th. Happy stitching.
Friday, September 5, 2008
Thursday, September 4, 2008

What is Needlepoint

One of the most confusing aspects of needlepoint is defining the different terms used in needlework. The term "needlework" is the broadest term used to describe any form of creative endeavor that is worked using a needle. Among the many varieties of needlework exists the term "needlepoint", but we will get to that in a moment... Embroidery, quilting, rug making, knitting and crocheting are also covered under the enormous umbrella of the term "needlework". In this article; we will be discussing needlepoint, embroidery, and tapestry.
First of all, let us get tapestry out of the way. The term "tapestry" is often misused in connection with needlepoint and embroidery. This is not a form of needlework. It is, however, a form of "textile art". Tapestry is a woven fabric, created by hand or machine. The design is created through an intricate weaving process. Needlepoint and embroidery works are often confused with tapestry work because the finished products closely resemble each other. In the simplest terms, these works are worked ON the canvas or fabric, whereas tapestry IS the fabric.
Now let us move on to embroidery. Embroidery is the art of embellishing or decorating textile fabric. Almost any fabric may be embroidered. The two most common materials for embroidery are cotton or linen. Throughout the centuries, clothing, furniture and a large assortment of other day to day items have been embroidered. Almost any type of thread may be used for embroidery, floss being the most common. Believe it or not - in the past human hair was used to embroider. Personally, I prefer to keep my hair attached to my head and use floss for my embroidery projects.
Often, objects may be embroidered into a piece. Decorative stones, beads or shells can be worked into a fabric using embroidery. Until the 19th century, embroidery was referred to as "canvas work". During the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries the term "petit point" was commonly used to describe embroidery. Today, petit point refers to needlepoint that is worked on canvas that is 16-mesh or smaller. There are two different methods of classifying embroidery.
The first method divides embroidery into two groups: surface embroidery and, as previously mentioned, canvas work. Surface embroidery encompasses any design that is worked on top of the fabric. Canvas work consists of any design that is stitched into the canvas. These two terms are very broad and not very enlightening. I prefer the second method of classifying.
The second method divides embroidery into two groups that are easier to understand: counted thread and free embroidery. Counted thread embroidery consists of any piece that is worked using a pre-determined pattern. The pattern may be printed on the fabric or not. Counted cross stitch and needlepoint are the two common types of counted thread embroidery. Yes, I said needlepoint is a form of embroidery. I will get to that in a moment... Free embroidery is a form that does not worry about the foundation fabric. A free piece is worked without counting or design. Each stitch is placed independently, hence the name. Crewel work is an excellent example of free embroidery.
Finally, we come to needlepoint. What is needlepoint? Needlepoint, as I stated earlier is a form of embroidery. Remember, embroidery was commonly referred to as "canvas work" before the 19th century. Today, canvas work is called needlepoint. While embroidery is worked on either cloth or canvas, needlepoint is worked primarily on canvas. Woolen yarns are used for stitching needlepoint projects. Needlepoint stitches are "patterned" stitches. That is to say, stitches that have pre-determined counted patterns. There are literally hundreds of needlepoint stitches. Many of these stitches started out as embroidery stitches and have been adjusted for needlepoint canvas. Some of the more common needlepoint stitches are: cross stitch, bargello, gobelin stitch, basketweave, tent stitch, continental stitch, back stitch, chain stitch, and diagonal stitch.
These are just a few of the many needlepoint stitches available today. For a more comprehensive list of these stitches, with instructions and diagrams, visit Stitchopedia - an encyclopedia of needlepoint stitches
These are the definitions of tapestry, embroidery and needlepoint in the most simple of terms. Basically, tapestry is the art of weaving the design into a fabric, thus becoming the fabric itself. Embroidery is the art of embellishing and decorating an existing fabric. Needlepoint is the art of working the design into canvas. Whichever type of needlework you choose to engage in, all have the capacity to give many hours of creative pleasure to you.
Carolyn McNeil, creator of http://www.stitchopedia.com an encyclopedia of needlepoint stitches Stitchopedia is an instructional site that demonstrates needlepoint stitches including straight, cross, looped, composite,& diagonal plus the basics of needlepoint. Each stitch has illustrations and step by step instructions. We have also included a "printable version" of each diagram.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carolyn_Mcneil

Cross Stitch - Working With The Needle

Overview
Working with a needle requires both skill and patience. If you know how to make cross stitch with needle and thread you will surely know that the when completed the picture look very beautiful. You must be wondering what cross stitch is about? Well let me walk you through some of the facts and figures of cross stitch.
Cross stitch is a traditional type of embroidery that can be adapted to either simple or complex designs. With the help of a needle and skeins of thread small cross stitches are made on the cross stitch fabric. Initially cross stitch were used to decorate the house linen, as pictures on the walls and to put on clothes for decoration. Even today cross stitch is used for decoration purposes but now the patterns have changed from the traditional to the innovative and stylish.
Know it better
You can take cross stitch up as a hobby. Even children can do cross stitch to show their creativity and utilize their time resourcefully. You can begin with the starters’ kit and gradually go up to a more professional looking picture or portrait. Learning cross stitch is not difficult and just about anyone can do it.
Care and maintenance
When working with cross stitch patters and samplers or as a matter of facts any kind of cross stitch one must keep in mind some important instruction regarding the material and the way to start working.
Firstly, choosing a pattern can be a tough job. There are so many in the market that you will easily get confused. Select one that suits your requirement matching with the place or décor you intend to use it. While removing the thread from the skein pull lightly to avoid getting the thread all tangled. Start with darker color and do the light one at last, this will ensure the pattern does not look dirty when completed.
Use a sharp scissors to cut the ends of the thread. This way the stitch will be neat and strong even on the reverse side and always keep a separate succors in the cross stitch box.
Before you get the cross stitch farmed make sure you’ve got it washed or dry cleaned so that the picture is clean and clearly viable when framed.
You can easily show your own creativity with cross stitch by using the cross stitch pattern design software’s available in the market.
Alan MacLachlan is an professional author written various articles this time he is writting article at http://www.allcrossstitch.co.uk.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Alan_MacLachlan
Monday, August 25, 2008

Snowman



Snowman Medley
some are tall with scarves of blue, others, wide, with bowties too, snow men for you,
Designer:

Heart In Hand Needleart
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $7.00

This one looks like a lot of fun for those that are readers. Here is the link:http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-4384-156-snowman-medley.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

Winter Scene



Winter Wonder
a child dressed for winter pulling a Christmas tree
Designer:

Dragon Dreams Inc.
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $6.00
This one looks as though you could do more than one kind of project with. Here is the link if you would like to purchase it: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-9409-156-winter-wonder.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

Snowball of the Month



Snowball Of The Month-January
Designer:

CM Designs
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $6.50
I thought this was to cute not to share. If you would like to stitch this piece, follow this link to purchase it: http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-21090-156-snowball-of-the-month-january.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101
Wednesday, August 20, 2008

Enhance Your Embroidery With Beads And Sequins

All embroidery projects are absolutely beautiful on their own, and often need no form of enhancement. But for that extra special finish you can add beads and sequins to your embroidery.
There are a few ways to add these extra special touches to your embroidery projects. You can incorporate them in to your stitches as you are creating your embroidery piece. To incorporate beads and sequins in to your embroidery stitches you will need very tiny beads and sequins, look in your local hobby store for seed beads and matching sequins. When attaching something as small as a seed bead to any project you will need to make sure you have a small enough needle, so make sure you purchase a beading needle.
You can also add beads and sequins to your embroidery projects once you have finished them. For example, you may only wish to add a few beads or sequins to highlight an area, such as the sparkle on a start or the twinkle in a characters eyes. This finish is very understated, but it will add just that little touch of perfection many sewers seek in their embroidery projects. You may wish to use a clear thread for this, so as not to disturb the colors of the embroidery or the sequins and beads.
Another method for attaching beads and sequins to embroidery is by using surface embroidery. This is a little more technical than simple sewing the beads and sequins directly onto the fabric. With surface embroidery of any kind the idea is to create a pattern on the top of the fabric, with minimal wastage of thread on the reverse, it can also cover a large area very quickly, where are sewing on individual beads and sequins cannot.
There are many methods of surface embroidery, although for attaching items such as beads and sequins I would recommend trying a crochet method. You simply use a tiny crochet hook to pass the thread though the fabric and when it comes back through, you make the next look and also attach a bead or sequin. This is also known as surface crochet, and can make your embroidery projects very original.
If you are looking for an even more amazing finish to your embroidery projects you could consider adding specialty threads, such as metallic threads or even embroidery threads made of special fibers such as silk or mohair.
Written by Laura Marsh. Did you find the information on beads and sequins with embroidery useful? You can find out more about enhancing your embroidery at http://www.simplyblackwork.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Laura_Marsh
Friday, August 15, 2008

Embroidered Pillow Cases

Vines & Borders Pillow Cases

Pillow cases can be fun to do. Even if you use the pillows as a decoration on a bed.
Wednesday, August 13, 2008

Adding interest with cross stitch

Contrary to popular belief, cross stitching can be interesting. Cross stitching can also add interest to a room in several ways. One way is to repeat elements that are found in a detailed cross stitch pattern and place these elements throughout the room. Another way is to set up part of a room to look exactly like a pattern. Finally, a third way is to have a picture converted to a cross stitch pattern and then display both the picture and the finished cross stitched piece.
One way you can add interest to a room is by building upon a pattern that you like. Once you find a cross stitch pattern you like, take several smaller images found within the pattern and cross stitch each image as a separate piece. You have two options of how to treat these separate pieces. One option is to frame each piece and hang the frames around the original cross stitched pattern. For example, in a pattern that has several different flowers, each flower could be cross stitched and framed individually. The second option is use the separate pieces as accent pieces, such as pillow cushions, drawstring bags, or miniature wall hangings. For example, if the pattern has several phrases or sentences in it, each phrase or sentence could be cross stitched on its own pillow cushion and placed on chairs in the same room as the original design. Both options will make the room more interesting because people will want to look around to find where the smaller images have been placed. Make it a game and see who can correctly guess how many smaller images there are in the room!
A second way to add interest is to take your favourite design and repeat it in real life. For example, if the design has a white blanket draped over a wooden rocking chair, then choose a room and place a white blanket over a wooden rocking chair. Next, cross stitch this design, frame it and place it in the same room as the rocking chair and blanket. The design doesn't have to be complicated; it can be something as simple as a flower. When the design is simple, or small, just remember to place the finished cross stitch design beside the real life object. To add even more interest, repeat this idea for several small designs in the same room, or throughout the house. Have fun decorating!
A third way to add interest is to have a picture converted to a cross stitch pattern. There are several businesses that offer this service or you can buy software and create your own pattern. When you are finished cross stitching, frame the finished piece and hang it beside the actual picture. A good quality pattern will make the cross stitching look exactly like your picture. Plus, it's a simple way to get people talking!
I hope you have found these ideas interesting and helpful. Not only will they help to make a room more interesting, but they are also conversation starters.
Visit http://www.beautifulcreations.ca to see unique and interesting patterns, plus check out our free newsletter, project ideas and cross stitch tips!
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Joanne_Jones

Cross Stitch Kits - What's The Difference?

This is an interesting article. I still like the counted cross stitch the best. Happy reading.


If you go into a typical craft store, you will see the supplies for many types of crafts. For cross stitching, you will find thread, beads, fabric, patterns and kits. Looking at the cross stitch kits, you can see that there are several different types to choose from. Below, is a quick description of each type of kit and the main advantage and disadvantage for each one.
Counted Cross Stitch – Stitches are done on a piece of blank aida cloth. By using a pattern (also called a chart) you have to count the squares on the cloth to know where to place your stitches. For example, if you start with a symbol in the middle of the pattern you will place the corresponding stitch on the middle of the aida cloth. From there, count how many stitches there are of that symbol on the pattern and place them on the cloth relative to the first stitch.
The advantage of this method is that the look of the finished piece is uniform for the whole piece and many stitchers like this look the best. The disadvantage of this method is that it is easy to lose count of the stitches, resulting in an error in where the stitches have been placed on the cloth. To correct the error, you would then need to pull out the incorrect stitches.
Stamped Cross Stitch – The design is printed on the fabric, usually in colour, which will tell you what colours to cross stitch and where. I find that stamped cross stitch works best when the design is simple and you only need to use a small number of colours.
The advantage of this method is that you don't need to rely on a pattern or chart to know where to place your stitches, which can result in fewer mistakes than counted cross stitch. The disadvantage is that if the colours printed on the fabric are very similar, it can be hard to distinguish what colour to place where.
Embellished Cross Stitch – A design is printed on fabric and only a few parts on the finished piece need to be filled in or accented with cross stitching.
The advantage of this type is that it is faster to cross stitch an embellished fabric because you do not need to cross stitch the entire picture. The disadvantage of this method is that sometimes the pattern that is printed on the cloth is not printed straight. Also, some people think that the finished piece is not as pretty as pieces that are not embellished.
No-count Cross Stitch – Outlines are printed on the fabric and a chart shows what colour to fill in with x's.
The advantage of this method is that it is supposed to be faster than counted cross stitch, as you don't have to count to find out where each stitch should go. The disadvantage is that, similar to embellished cross stitch, sometimes the pattern that is printed on the cloth is not printed straight.
Every stitcher has a preference in the type of cross stitching that they like to do. Their preference is based on how much time they have to cross stitch, the end result and the ease of cross stitching that kit. Explore the different kits available and see which one you like the best.
For more cross stitch information and project ideas, please visit http://www.beautifulcreations.ca
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Joanne_Jones

Coffee Menu


Coffee Menu
coffee, latte, mocha, espresso, dark roast, hazelnut, vanilla, cappuccino, Irish cream, people sitting at a table drinking coffee
Designer:

Little House Needleworks
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $8.00

Follow this link to purchase this item:
Monday, August 11, 2008

Book Marks



Elegant Bookmarks (2)
Floral artistry in watercolor hues is used to create these radiant blossoms. Subtle colors and patterns weave an elegant, reserved design on 14 count ivory Aida. Easy finishing instructions are included. Kit contains cotton embroidery thread, charms 14 count ivory Aida fabric, needle and easy instructions including an easy-to-read multicolor chart.
Designer:

Dimensions
Publisher:

Dimensions, Inc.
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

9" Long (23 cm)
Floss:

Cotton Thread
Fabric:

14 count ivory Aida
Price: $10.99
Book Marks are always a fun project to work on when you want to do something fairly quickly.
Follow this link to buy this product:


Friday, August 8, 2008

Fall Patterns


With Fall being upon us, I thought it would be nice to share some fall patterns.


Cross Stitch Lite #1 Fall
Country designs for Halloween and Thanksgiving. Designs include Cornucopia, The First Thanksgiving, Give Thanks, Happy Halloween, Happy Halloween to You, Halloween Treats Breadcover, Be Thankful Breadcover, and Ghost Crossing.
Designer:

Graph-It Arts
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $5.00

Follow this link to purchase these patterns:

http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-10259-118-cross-stitch-lite-1-fall.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

Napkins



Royal Classic Napkin 14 Count 15"X 15"
SKU:
RC4852
Weight:
0.21 LBS.
Price:
$4.99
Follow this link to purchase this item:

Cardinal Hang-up



Designer:

Imaginating
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $6.00

Click on this link to purchase this item:

http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-21182-80-cardinal-hang-up.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101
Monday, August 4, 2008

Custom Embroidery

Aside from the beauty of nature, your own personal style as well as your unique individuality can be reflected in any form of art, including the laborious art form of embroidery. Embroidery is an art form that uses needles and threads to make designs and patterns on any piece of cloth or fabric by weaving or sewing. It entails clear eyesight and dexterous hands to do the intricate details of designs and patterns. There are several types of customized embroidery that can surely reflect your total personality type.
Custom embroidery can be done either traditionally by hand or by electronic embroidery sewing machines operated and controlled by computers. Hand designs are truly difficult, especially if you desire a specific design that will involve complicated sewing and weaving of threads. There are several types of hand designs that can be used to make custom embroidery. A few of the things you can use are the famous Assisi design, Blackwork, Counted Thread, and Whitework.
Aside from hand made designs, custom embroidery can also be done through embroidery sewing machines. This type can give you many varied custom designs. You can also give your own design that can very well express your individuality, which can be easily crafted since it is done with the aid of computers. Unlike the hand designs, computer made custom embroidery can be done without going through much difficulties.
Besides the traditional embroidery makers or stores near you, the Internet can also be an avenue for you to have the type of embroidery product that will match the specific details that you desire. You can browse online for embroidery stores that you can trust. Just make sure that the on line store that you decided to transact business with are indeed reliable and authentic.
Embroidery provides detailed information on Embroidery, Embroidery Machines, Custom Embroidery, Embroidery Designs and more. Embroidery is affiliated with Used Embroidery Machines.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jennifer_Bailey

An Introduction to the World of Embroidery

When you think of embroidery, you probably think of your grandmother knitting you a pink bunny rabbit outfit for Christmas. Embroidery just might be the domain of your grandmother, but it still had plenty of people who are interested in getting started in embroidery. There is a real generation gap between today’s youth and their grandparents. Teenagers seem to be more interested in their Sony PS2 and AOL Chat than learning about hand made crafts. However, the tradition is alive and well on the internet. After all, embroidery doesn’t change every six months and embroidery has been here for years. How long has the PS2 been out again?
As far back as Egyptian and Hebrew times individuals decorated their clothing with rich embroidery. The 18th and 19th Centuries brought embroidery to a whole new class of people, and even today, it seems that the craft has successfully migrated to cyberspace. Unlike a lot of other industries including travel agents who have seemed have missed the boat.
The internet has allowed hobbyists and professionals from all over the world to mingle and discuss their latest embroidery projects. There are dozens of custom embroidery websites and people are always looking for free embroidery designs.
In fact, A Google search for the term “embroidery” shows more than 70 merchants advertising their embroidery related products. Bidding for competitive terms can become fierce very quickly. But clearly, at least 70 advertisers think embroidery is a term worth pursing.
Overall, while embroidery might not be a rock’n’roll type hobby (was it ever?), it certainly has gone the way of the Dodo. If you like embroidery, there are a lot of online resources for you to explore.
Tim Branch is a contributing author at http://www.katesembroidery.com. Kates Embroidery has embroidery and embroidery designs. information.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Tim_Branch
Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Victorian Houses


I love Victorian Houses. Here is the information and link to this project:

Country Victorian Cottage
Designer:

Nancy Spruance Designs
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $7.00

Stitch Designs


This looks like a lot of fun. I haven't tried stitching a purse yet. If your interested in trying here is the info if you would like to buy this item:

Sampler Purse, The
Designer:

Dames Of The Needle
Product Type:

Book or Leaflet
Price: $20.00


Friday, July 18, 2008

Embroidery Designs

Embroidery is an art of materials (mostly fabrics) with designs stitched with together with yarn.
This can be done either by hand or by machine. The thread that you use is a special one made only for embroidery work. It comes in many colors also yarn can be used but this is used mostly for embroidery work called crewel and you will usually use a heavier fabric. When doing crewel this can be framed and hung on the wall as a picture or for a decorative pillow on a sofa or for the seat covering of chairs. When embroidering the use of the right needle is very important. Needles are available in many types and different sizes. When doing embroidery the needles should be changed every 20 hours. A necessary skill for any embroiderer is to select the appropriate needles. Example for crewel a medium length needle is used with a very sharp point. All purpose needles can be used f or most embroidery projects. For beginners an assorted needle package would be the best purchase for beginners.
Sewing machines can also be used to create machine embroidery designs. This type of embroidery is very popular for designs on jackets, sweatshirts, and sports wear etc. Mostly these embroidery designs machines are computerized that read digital embroidery designs files made by some specific software. Many machine embroidery designs can be found on internet and one can easily work on those by downloading designs. There are some machines only for embroidery designs purposes while others are combination of embroider design and sewing. You can download some good embroidery designs from Embroidery Designs Shop
Article Source: http://EzineArticles
Friday, July 11, 2008

Walking to Town



Snow falls gently on our pair of winter walkers as they stop to admire the starry sky. You can almost hear the crunch of snow underfoot and smell the wood fires. This scene of rustic simplicity is worked on 18 count navy Aida to capture every frosty detail.Kit contains cotton thread, 18 count navy Aida, thread palette, needle and easy instructions.
Designer:

Fred Swan
Publisher:

Dimensions, Inc.
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

14" x 10" (36 x 25 cm)
Floss:

Cotton Thread
Fabric:

18 count navy Aida
Price: $20.99

Here is the link:

http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pm-5541-60-walking-to-town.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101

Seaside Cottages



Get away from it all and relax as you stitch this delightful beach scene. You can almost feel the sun's warmth and balmy breezes. It's stitched on 14 count white Aida with island colors of cotton thread. Half cross stitch is used for artistic effect.Kit contains cotton thread, 14 count white Aida, thread palette, needle, and easy instructions. This design uses half cross stitch for artistic effect.
Designer:

Karen Marie Zabroski
Publisher:

Dimensions, Inc.
Product Type:

Kit
Size:

18" x 7" (46 x 18 cm)
Floss:

Cotton Thread
Fabric:

14 count white Aida
Price: $21.99
I always have loved to go to the beach at the Cape growing up. That's one reason I like this pattern. Here is the link to buy this one:

Embroidery scissors


Precision pointed blades, stainless steel with gold plated handles. 1" cutting length.

Ultra Fine Gold Scroll Embroidery Scissors 3-1/2"
SKU:
083829
Weight:
0.2 LBS.
Price:
$3.99
Follow the link below to order these scissors:
Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Cross Stitching Tips For Beginners

If you talk to those who cross stitch, they will tell you that they enjoy cross stitching since it is very relaxing. This type of stitching also grants you a great feel of achievement and fulfillment to show off the finished works. The best thing is that cross-stitch is relatively easy to learn. Have you ever looked up to somebody's needlepoint work and marveled why it seems really beautiful? Do the color combination looks vivacious and the stitches look tidy and clean? In case you like to get the best result from your cross stitching works, simply follow these tricks and tips.

Always begin the stitching work from the center of the fabric. In order to find out the center of the fabric, fold it up in half two times. The center of your fabric will be at the point of intersection of the two foldings. Following the two arrows, you can find the center of the chart. One of the arrows will be in the mid left side of the chart and the other in the top center. Where these two arrows meet is the center stitch.

Most people like to begin cross stitching just about the center of the design so that the design is centralized on the fabric. This way, framing the finished work becomes easier. Another good thing about beginning at the center is that you find you will have sufficient material. It would be a downright stupidity in case you begin on one side, just to find later that after all the hard work, you don't have sufficient material to complete your needlepoint work.

If you are not paying attention on the current cross stitch plan, wrap up the fabric and keep it in a neat cardboard roll. Placing the fabric rolled up in place of folding it, will forestall creases in the fabric. As creases in the fabric are difficult to straighten out after the work is completed, it is better to avoid them as far as possible.

We can buy kits that come full with cross stitch fabric, threads, and directions or we can make our own. We can also sketch our own impressions on the fabric and become creative with different colors. Many books that instruct you how to cross stitch are available in the market, but videos on the topic is the best method to learn. Videos are better in many ways, than pictures printed on paper. The informative books and kits sold nowadays, we can generate some excellent art works with cross stitch. The work will look even better with the right kind of frame.

In case you are an absolute newbie, begin with a simple kit of cross stitch, and once you become more experienced, try to do more detailed works or design your own creations. It's a good way to start by writing Marry Christmas in a handed-down Christmas cross stitch method and you will be surprised to see the result. Try making a project with your favorite slogan or your initials. It will definitely be a simple but exceptional idea. You can seek assistance from chart generators to design alphabets and this will help you create your own pattern in some simple and easy steps.

You can Buy Needlepoint kits suitable for beginners from http://www.buyneedlepoint.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sajeena_Ali

Cross Stitch Materials and Preparation

Find out what cross stitch materials and preparation you need to get started stitching.

Preparation

You should always cut the fabric you are going to stitch onto at least 8-10 cm larger than the finished size of the design, this will allow you to turn up a seam, or to mount your work or make it into a gift.
If you are making a garment with a cross stitch design you should mark out the pattern of the garment onto the fabric before you start stitching to ensure you place it correctly.
To prevent the fabric from fraying you can either turn over the edge and machine stitch it or bind it using tape. I find masking tape good for this job.
You should always start stitching from the center of the fabric. Fold the fabric in half one way and then the other way to find the center point.
Separate your threads - If you are working from a kit the thread for the project will likely be supplied. You should separate and mark the colours before you start to make sure you identify each colour correctly. A floss organizer is very handy for this job and you can pick one up for only a few dollars these days.

Equipment

Very little equipment is actually needed for cross stitch. If you are working from a kit the fabric, needle and threads will most likely be supplied. You will need an embroidery hoop or frame to mount the fabric on. Take a look at the cross stitch materials information below:

Hoops and Frames

If you mount the cross stitch fabric on a hoop or frame your work will be easier to handle and stitches will be kept flat and smooth. You should choose a frame that accommodates the whole design so you don't have to fold or bend the fabric.

If you bind the outer ring of an embroidery hoop with white bias tape it will prevent it from marking the fabric and prevent slipping.

Needles

You should stitch your design using a tapestry needle which has a large eye and a blunt end to prevent damage to the fabric. Choose a size of needles that slides easily through the holes of the fabric without distorting or enlarging them.

Scissors

A sharp pair of embroidery or sewing sissors will make you floss cuts neat and tidy.

Thimble

A thimble will help stop your finger hurting.

Threads

Cross stitch designs are worked with floss thread. These come in many colours and clever use of colour creates wonderful cross stitch pieces.

Fabric

The Majority of cross stitch is worked on Aida fabric which comes in several sizes. The most popular size is 14 count which means there are 14 threads to 1 inch.

Laura Anne Grey has been a cross stitcher and enthusiast for over ten years. She owns a craft business in South Wales and is an expert in her field. Find more information on Cross Stitch at http://www.lacrossstitch.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Laura_Anne_Grey

How to Embroider For Beginners

If you are interested in learning embroidery, then the first step is to learn about the various stitches. Once you have learnt and understood each stitch, then no matter how complex a design maybe, it is not difficult to fill it up. Ideally, you must start with a simple design and the progress towards larger designs that also require more detailing.

In this guide of how to embroider for beginners we will take a look at various embroidery stitches...

The stitches:

The line stitch: This is the stitch usually done to create the outline of a design. This is the simplest and most basic stitch also used in sewing objects. There are various line stitches, which are as follows:

Running stitch: This is also termed as the basic sewing stitch; and is also used as a decorative embroidery stitch. Right-handed individuals will work this stitch from the right to the left, or top to bottom, as required. The left-handers will ideally work from left to right, or bottom to top. This is a forward running, continuous stitch.

Whipped running stitch: In this stitch the needle has to be brought up to the point where the running stitch began. Following this the needle has to be taken down through each of the running stitches. If a contrast thread is used then the line would look like a candy.

Back stitch: This is also an outline stitch and is used for sewing objects. This is a tight stitch. With this stitch the gap in the running stitch is covered.

Outline stitch: In this type of stitch the stitches form a solid rope-like line.

Stem stitch: This is a stitch, which is tighter than the outline stitch. This stitch is ideal for creating embroidered leaves and flowers.

The other stitches include:

Coral stitch
Scroll stitch
Chained stitch
Fishbone stitch
Flat stitch
Satin stitch
Buttonhole stitch
Lazy-daisy stitch
French knot
Fly stitch

Embroidery patterns can be used to adorn any kind of dresses including wedding outfits and pageant dresses.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jennie_Gandhi
Monday, June 30, 2008

New Polls have been posted

I am taking a couple of polls. Take a look at the left hand side toward the top of the page to find them. Take a moment to fill out one or both of them. Your views are important.

Northwind Owl Counted Cross Stitch Kit



I have to admit that I've always loved owls. Follow the link below to find this cross stitch pattern to work on:
http://www.everythingcrossstitch.com/pc-22064-238-northwind-owl-counted-cross-stitch-kit.aspx?AFFILIATEID=10101
Friday, June 27, 2008

Make it easy to travel with cross stitch

It’s summer and that means vacations. Needlepoint can be a wonderful and relaxing activity during long hours waiting in airports and riding in a car. Here are some tips, adapted from my book, NEEDLEPOINT TRADE SECRETS to help make stitching on vacation more enjoyable.

Needlepoint in the Car

Car trips are great times for doing needlepoint! The needlepoint you pick should either be worked "in hand" (not on stretcher bars) or small.

Make sure you pack in your project bag scissors, a zipper bag to clean up your orts, threads, instructions, and many extra needles. I can't tell you how many projects got delayed because I lost my only needle.

A car trip is a great place to stitch large areas which use familiar stitches. I often reserve projects like this for trips.

Needlepoint in Hotel Rooms

Hotel rooms usually use lower wattage bulbs and this can make it hard to see. You can pack a 100 watt bulb in your luggage and change it when you get to the room.

Many hotels now have special fixtures which use fluorescent bulbs and you can't do this. If this happens to you, sit near the window during the day to stitch. Using lighter colors or larger mesh also helps.

But to be sure you have enough light, no matter what, get a small project lamp which is battery operated. If you're going on a long trip, be sure to pack extra batteries -- they can be hard to find n foreign countries.

Needlepoint in your Luggage

Don't leave your needlepoint on stretcher bars in your luggage. Take it off the bars and store it with the threads. Group the bars with a rubber band and pack them. Your tacks will have to go into you checked luggage.

I always pack an extra project in my suitcase to work on if I finish my current project.

Before you leave be sure you have ALL the threads you need and all instructions. You may not be near a place to buy more.

Needlepoint on Airplanes

It's OK to take needlepoint on board planes, although the regulations about scissors and cutters change often. In 2007, scissors are OK, but round cutters are not. The safest bet is to have a pair of bunt-tipped child's scissors you use just for traveling.

Put your name and address in any project bag you have. If you lose it, this might bring it back to you.

I always pack an extra small project (my airplane project) in my tote bag. Having this to do keeps me happy and busy even when the flight from SF is delayed 3 hours because of fog.

The light in airplanes, especially at night, is poor, the battery-operated project light is perfect for planes.

Since newer planes don't have ashtrays, getting rid of orts is a problem. Use you empty glass or bring on a small zipper bag you can throw away.

Janet M. Perry is one of the leading writers of needlepoint stitch guides in the world. She writes innovative guides for needlepoint canvases from over 20 designers. She puts into practice her motto to make needlepoint fast, fun and affordable.

She is an expert in needlepoint, both on the Web and through her writing as the Needlepoint Pro for Cross-Stitch & Needlework magazine. She works with designers, shops, and thread manufacturers on new products and regularly reports on trends in needlepoint.

Her newest book, Needlepoint Trade Secrets, will be available in the summer of 2007 on Amazon. Visit her website (http://www.napaneedlepoint.com) or blog (http://www.nuts-about-needlepoint.com) to learn about my newest products.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Janet_M._Perry

Needlepoint and Focal Point

With the many different threads and stitches available to us as needlepointers, it is easy to agree with the saying “This is not your Grandmother’s needlepoint!” We’ve come a long way from the days where endless streams of continental were done by dignified ladies. This is a very good thing.

Having so many threads to choose from, and so many stitches at our disposal makes making lovely needle art easy — or is it?

It is all too easy for a canvas to get overwhelmed by too many textures, colors, threads and stitches, so that the piece loses it’s focus and looks like a mishmash instead of something worth the work you put into it.

When you get a new canvas and are thinking about how to stitch it, decide which things in the piece will be your focal points. There should be one major focal point and there may be a very few additional focal points. The focal point is the most important area of the design and all the stitching everywhere in the piece needs to support it.

Next chose the threads (and maybe the stitches) for your focal point. These should be threads and stitches which make the focal point come towards the viewer. So for example, if your background is going to be wool, make the focal point silk or pearl. Use a more textured stitch, or a lighter color.

You can pick and chose stitches for your design as you go, adding some texture here, picking a different thread there.

1-3-5 Rule for Great Needlepoint Pieces
But keep in mind while you work what I call “Mary Shipp’s Rule.” Mary is an amazing stitcher and teacher and one of my mentors. She says that there are three aspects of needlepoint — thread, color and stitches. The line between lovely needleart and confusion is in how many of each of these you use.

In good needleart, one of these should be dominant, another should be “just an accent” and the third should be somewhere in the middle. In fact she uses the proportions 1-3-5 to demonstrate this.

For example, if you are doing a piece in all wool, you could have lots of colors (say a bouquet of flowers) and relatively few stitches (maybe one stitch for the leaves and another for flower center). But you could also have lots of stitches (maybe all the different furs of animals in a Noah’s Ark piece). And in that case your colors would mostly be browns and tans.

But what if you made every flower a different stitch or every animal a fanciful color? You can probably imagine how confused this would look.

When you are planning to stitch a canvas, start with the focal point and then move on as you stitch (which is what I do) or as you plan, keeping in mind Mary’s rule.

And if you start to feel as if you have gone too far — evaluate the piece according to the rule, and make adjustments. Don’t be afraid to rip things out if the piece is not working. a piece which you will finish is much better than one which will languish in your stash.

Janet M. Perry is one of the leading writers of needlepoint stitch guides in the world. She writes innovative guides for needlepoint canvases from over 20 designers. She puts into practice her motto to make needlepoint fast, fun and affordable.

She is an expert in needlepoint, both on the Web and through her writing as the Needlepoint Pro for Cross-Stitch & Needlework magazine. She works with deigners, shops, and thread manufacturers on new products and regularly reports on trends in needlepoint.

Her newest book, Needlepoint Trade Secrets, will be available in the summer of 2007 on Amazon. Visit her website (http://www.napaneedlepoint.com) or blog (http://www.nuts-about-needlepoint.com) to learn about my newest products.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Janet_M._Perry